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Being Honest for a Change

I believe there is an important factor in change work. This is honesty, or acknowledging the existing situation.

Many self help techniques ignore this and by doing so they create a conflict or battle.

Let's give a simple example. Ken suddenly thinks:
'God I feel really terrible!'
(He's got a slight attack of flu) Now it is no good denying this thought. So he acknowledges it:
I feel really terrible.
And qualifies it:
at this precise moment in this precise space. (Here and now).
So he's got flue, suddenly feels so bad he can't complete his tasks, and thinks a negative thought and acknowledges it fully, with full agreement. But qualifies it to be super-accurate and super-honest.

This may be enough. By fully acknowledging the situation the problem may disappear.

He continues:
But I could feel a lot better in the future.
This is a true statement. No one knows the future. Even highly incredible events can occur. We can never be absolutely sure ....
I could feel better in a few hours, minutes, or even seconds .. I could even feel a bit better now. (This is a new now, of course)
Now it is possible to use positive true suggestions to enhance well being:
I may notice feeling better and much more energetic and happy ...
By now he's bored with all this stuff, forgets about the flu and gets on with his tasks.
Later:
Are you feeling better Ken?
What do you mean?
You said you had flue
Oh Yes! Er, I suppose it went away. I forgot about it.

The example involves illness, but is perhaps more relevant to psychological states. The principle is the same:
Acknowledge the truth of the situation
Qualify it to make it super-accurate (here and now)
Use true suggestions. Be super-honest!
Sometimes people use positive thinking to force themselves to believe something they 'know' is false. Not surprisingly, this does not work very well!

So be honest for a change!

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Most Recent Revision: 9-11-99.
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